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Right Tree, Right Place

Our tree trimming practices balance the importance trees have on the environment with providing safe, reliable electric service.

By planting the right tree in the right place, you can help preserve your community’s trees while also serving utility customers.

Consider the Following When Selecting a Tree

  • Height. Will it come within 10 feet of power lines when it’s fully grown?
  • Canopy spread. How wide will the tree grow?
  • Growth rate. A slow growing-species is typically stronger and lives longer than fast-growing species.
  • Form or shape. A columnar tree grows in less space. Round or V-shaped trees provide more shade.

Tree Types

The taller a tree will become, the further it needs to be from overhead lines.

Small (<20 Feet)

When planting within 15 feet of power lines is unavoidable

  • Flowering Crabapple
  • Flowering Dogwood
  • Redbud
  • Serviceberry
  • Sweetbay Magnolia
  • Wafer-Ash
  • Common Hawthorn

Medium (25-50 Feet)

Plant minimum 20 feet from overhead lines

  • Flowering Crabapple
  • Flowering Dogwood
  • Redbud
  • Serviceberry
  • Sweetbay Magnolia
  • Wafer-Ash
  • Common Hawthorn Evergreens (up to 30 feet)
  • American Arborvitae
  • Junipers
  • Japanese Yew
  • False Cypress

Large (40+ Feet)

Plant 50+ feet away from overhead lines

  • Ginko
  • Norway Maple
  • Oak
  • Sweetgum
  • Linden or Basswood
  • London Plane
  • Sugar Maple Evergreens (30+ Feet)
  • White Pine
  • Austrian Pine
  • White Firs
  • Blue Spruce

Trees Not Suitable Near Power Lines

  • Catalpa
  • Carolina Poplar
  • Silver Maple
  • Boxelder
  • Willow
  • Siberian Elm
  • Black Locust
  • Cottonwood
  • Tree of Heaven
  • Mulberry
  • Elm species

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